Poetry Poster project launched at the Australia & New Zealand Festival of Literature & Arts in London last week.

Next up in the series is Bill Nelson.

 

Pānui Poetry Posters invites poets to send their work out into the world; allowing distinct Antipodean voices to be heard across the globe, to be shared and enjoyed by anyone, anywhere.

This project features the words of New Zealand poets on a series of uniquely designed posters, free for you to download and print.

New posters will be added over the next couple of weeks, so keep up to date here and via Facebook / Twitter / Instagram.

 

PP_A3 BILL NELSON HYDROPHOBICBill Nelson Hydrophobic (2015)

Reproduced with permission of the author and Victoria University Press.

DOWNLOAD A3 POSTER HERE

Bill Nelson has an MA from the International Institute of Modern Letters, Victoria University Wellington and was awarded the Biggs Poetry Prize (2009). His work has appeared in Sport, Hue & Cry, Shenandoah, Minarets, The Lumière Reader, 4th Floor, Swamp and Blackmail Press. Bill was part of the project The Sparks Fly Upwards (2010) at City Gallery Wellington and in Against the Prevailing Winds, an exhibition for the Courtenay Place light boxes (2013). He is writer and co-editor at Up Country. Victoria University Press will publish a collection of Bill’s poems later this year. Bill lives in Wellington, Aotearoa New Zealand.

LINKS:   Up Country  |  Victoria University Press

 

You can read and download the first poster in the series, featuring Rachel O’Neill here

You can read and download the second poster in the series, featuring Joan Fleming here

 

Pānui Poetry Posters project and poster design by Lily Hacking.

pānui

1. (verb) (-hia,-tia) to announce, notify, advertise, publish, proclaim.

2. (verb) (-hia,-tia) to read, speak aloud.

3. (noun) public notice, announcement, poster, proclamation.

http://www.maoridictionary.co.nz

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